Skip Navigation LinksWelcome Articles Browse Articles Article

Starter tenancies
Rating: 1351 user(s) have rated this article Average rating: 5.0
Posted by: petewebb, on 10/10/2012, in category "Tenancy types"
Views: this article has been read 23909 times
Summary: A starter tenancy (also known as a probationary tenancy) is one of a fixed short term, usually 12 months but they can vary between 6 to 18 months. The conditions of these tenancies are designed to give landlords more rights in the process of evicting undesirable tenants and are primarily used for new tenants.

strater tenancyWhat is a Starter tenancy?


A starter tenancy (also known as a probationary tenancy) is one of a fixed short term, usually 12 months but they can vary between 6 to 18 months. The conditions of these tenancies are designed to give landlords more rights in the process of evicting undesirable tenants and are primarily used for new tenants.


Reasons to use them.


1. Tenancies can be reviewed before they are converted to Assured tenancies,
2. Any problems in the tenancy can be easily remedied.
3. Starter tenancies encourage new tenants to develop good habits and behaviour.
4. They offer protection to existing long-term tenants and communities.


Reasons NOT to use them


1. They offer less rights to new tenants, including tenants moving their tenancy from one dwelling to another within the same Housing Association/ Co-op.
2. Most new tenants are responsible, well-behaved people.
3. Tenants may be discouraged from moving if they have to face a Starter Tenancy in a new dwelling.
4. They could be used by landlords to oust “undesirable” tenants with little reason.


The difference between these tenancies and Assured tenancies are mainly that landlords can more easily evict problem tenants. Non-payment or persistent late payment of rent, anti-social behaviour, illegal activity (for example, drug dealing) and not allowing workmen access to perform repairs or safety checks are the most common reasons for eviction. In order to evict a tenant with an Assured Tenancy, a landlord has to prove the grounds (legal reason) for your eviction however with a Starter Tenancy you can be evicted without grounds if you break any of the conditions of your tenancy. A court order still has to be obtained but it is much easier when you don’t have to prove grounds.


One advantage of the starter tenancy is in the case of shared housing. Disputes between tenants in shared housing can escalate into anti-social or threatening behaviour and possibly violence. In these cases, having a starter tenancy would mean the problems can be solved more easily by evicting the problem tenants.


How would you rate this article?


User Feedback

Post your comment
Name:
E-mail:
Comment:
Add your CommentSubmit Cancel